The Delicious Side of Customer Satisfaction

This is a story about M&M’s and customer satisfaction (eventually).

On a dare, someone asked me to name three prominent books on Customer Satisfaction off the top of my head.

Here is my list:

  1. Positively Outrageous Service: How to Delight and Astound Your Customers and Win Them for Life
  2. Becoming a Category of One: How Extraordinary Companies Transcend Commodity and Defy Comparison
  3. Customer Satisfaction is Worthless, Customer Loyalty is Priceless: How to Make Them Love You, Keep You Coming Back, and Tell Everyone They Know

Yes, I know.  I didn’t list “The Ultimate Question 2.0: How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World”. I think you would agree mentioning that book is just too predictable. And who wants to be predictable? After all, everyone knows that the most important question for your company’s future is, “Would you recommend us to a friend?” By simply asking your customers this powerful question you identify detractors who tarnish your reputation, and promoters who strengthen your company with positive word of mouth. This is especially valuable in the day and age of social media and millennials who can both single-handedly fuel or dry up your business.

But knowing who your promoters and detractors are is only half the battle. The other half requires a closed-loop feedback process where you contact your customers to determine their loyalty ratings, determine the next best actions to raise satisfaction and then develop appropriate responses. The result would be energized employees and delighted customers every time.

For me, it is less about the “question” than the focus on your employees being excited to serve the customer. Is it likely? I don’t know. Is it possible? You bet. Let’s find out more.

In “The Service Profit Chain,” authors Heskett, Sasser and Schlesinger spent five years researching the question – why do some firms do what they do well – year in and year out. They discovered links between company profit and growth and key relationships. One of those relationships is employee satisfaction/customer satisfaction. And they discovered that the relationship is mutually reinforcing: satisfied customers contribute to employee satisfaction, and vice-versa. But we are ahead of ourselves.

After reviewing hundreds of companies, the authors concluded that companies must manage the customer-employee “satisfaction mirror” and the customer value equation to achieve a “customer’s eye view’ of goods and services. In its simplest terms, satisfaction is mirrored in the faces of customers and the people who serve them, whether the encounter takes place face-to-face or not. This magical interaction occurs with a great deal of preparation and thought. To achieve this “satisfaction mirror” a company must produce the “employee job description, management policies, supporting technologies and rewards and recognition of the customer.”

For an organization to have satisfied employees, the authors recommend The Cycle of Capability:

  • Careful Employee Selection (and self-selection)
  • High-Quality Training
  • Well-Designed Support Systems (Information & Facilities)
  • Greater Latitude to Meet Customer Needs
  • Clear Limit on , and Expectations of, Employees
  • Appropriate Rewards and Frequent Recognition
  • Satisfied Employees
  • Employee Referrals of Potential Candidates

Outrageous stories about good service leading to customer satisfaction and fanatic loyalty abound.  A favorite of mine is Nordstrom’s, # 88 in Fortunes’ Best Companies to Work For in 2013.  Yes, I am a customer who, with a Tory Burch skirt in hand, needed the rest of the ensemble.  And with a simple question of “what department would you suggest I go to to find a top” I was accompanied for the next 30 minutes by an employee who walked me through every department, picked several tops and waited to weigh in on my choices as I tried them on. Wow! And Nordstrom is doing well financially.

Mars was #95 in favorite places to work this year. Let’s talk M&M’s. 192 million M&M’s in 25 colors are made every 8 hours.  2% are rejected for quality. Mars revenues have doubled in recent years – the customers are clearly happy. And the 1,230 Martians (yes that is what they are called) “adore coming to work”. That’s because the company believes in the “Five Principles of Mars” – quality, responsibility, mutuality, efficiency and freedom. Fortune reported that some unnamed employees are known to eat 1 ½ pounds of free M&M’s a day.

Now that is a cool “satisfaction mirror”!

By, Debra Koenig, President of B2A Consulting | 30 years of experience as a  business executive with leadership and consulting skills in Fortune 500 and private equity portfolio companies.

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